Category Archives: Recommended Reading

Information Visualization Reading List

Below is the most recent iteration of the reading list for my spring course in Information Visualization at Columbia Journalism School. Because I teach in a journalism school but all of my courses involve programming, I start every semester with a discussion about the role and culture of programming in general, facilitated by the first few pages of Douglas Rushkoff’s book “Program or be Programmed.” Unfortunately, this brief but powerful preface is not part of the digital edition, but I recommend locating a print copy even just for the sake of these pages.

Links provided are to the New York Public Library (which now has purchase options!) where possible; otherwise to the publisher.


Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Age by Douglas Rushkoff. Soft Skull Press, 2011.
Preface


Thinking With Type by Ellen Lupton. Princeton Architectural Press, 2010.
Text: Linearity, Birth of the User


Information Visualization: Perception for Design by Colin Ware. Morgan Kaufman, 2004.
Chapter 1: Foundation for a Science of Information Visualization



“Visualization” by Tamara Munzer, in Fundamentals of Computer Graphics, 3rd. ed. A K Peters/CRC Press, 2009.
Chapter 27: Visualization


Visual Explanations by Edward Tufte. Graphics Press, 1997.
Chapter 2: Visual and Statistical Thinking: Displays of Evidence for Making Decisions


Now You See It: Simple Visualization Techniques for Quantitative Analysis by Stephen Few. Analytics Press, 2009.
Chapter 5: Analytical Techniques and Practices


The Wall Street Journal Guide to Information Graphics by Dona Wong. W. W. Norton & Company, 2013.
Chapter 2: Chart Smart, Chapter 3: Ready Reference, Chapter 4: Tricky Situations


Interview with Amanda Cox. Substratum, Issue 6.


The Functional Art: An introduction to information graphics and visualization by Alberto Cairo. New Riders, 2012.
Profile 3: Steve Duenes, Profile 4: Hannah Fairfield, Profile 5: Jan Schwochow


The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman. Basic Books, 2002.
Chapter 6: The Design Challenge, Chapter 7: User-Centered Design


Now You See It: Simple Visualization Techniques for Quantitative Analysis by Stephen Few. Analytics Press, 2009.
Chapter 4: Analytical Interaction and Navigation


Thinking With Type Ellen Lupton. Princeton Architectural Press, 2010.
Letter: Anatomy, Size, Scale, Type Classification, Type Families, Superfamilies; Text: Tracking, Line Spacing, Alignment, Hierarchy; Grid: Grid as Program, Grid as Table, Multicolumn Grid, Modular Grid



Content-Out Layout by Nathan Ford. A List Apart, 2014.


“Five Common but Questionable Principles of Multimedia Learning” by Richard E. Clark & David F. Feldon, in The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning, 1st Ed. Cambridge University Press, 2005


“The Split-Attention Principle in Multimedia Learning” by Paul Ayres & John Sweller, in The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning, 1st Ed. Cambridge University Press, 2005


“The Worked-Out Examples Principle” by Alexander Renkl, in The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning, 1st Ed. Cambridge University Press, 2005